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Popular Posts & Videos For March 2013

Popular Posts & Videos For March 2013

The most popular posts and videos for March 2013

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Popular Posts & Videos For February 2013

Popular Posts & Videos For February 2013

The most popular posts and videos for February 2013

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10 Valentine’s Day Gifts For Climbers

Every month, HotHedz will deliver a new cap — wool, fleece, polyester-cotton blend, what have you – straight to his door… or P.O. box, in likely case that he lives out of his car.

If only the beanie of the month club were real.

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Vacations Vs. Trips

Semi-rad on how we classify the excursions we tend to go on as climbers:

Ever notice no one ever uses the word “vacation” when they describe outdoor-centric travel? We substitute “trip.” Taking a trip to Yosemite. A trip to Alaska. A trip to Baja. “Vacation” is more like spa, sightsee, relax, recharge, find the perfect balance between sitting and lying down in a chaise lounge somewhere, doze off in the sand — not endo, poop in a bag, get saddle sores, puke from exertion, get gobies from hand-jamming, explore new frontiers in body odor. Isn’t it?

I don’t know about you, but I usually feel like I need a “vacation” from my “trips” by the time they’re over.

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Popular Posts & Videos For January 2013

Popular Posts & Videos For January 2013

The most popular videos and posts for January 2013

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Climbers Against Cancer

Climbers Against Cancer is a group that was first mentioned on this site in an interview with Shauna Coxsey, and if you’re on Facebook or Instagram odds are good that you’ve seen some well-known climbers sporting brightly colored shirts supporting the cause.  But what is the cause and where did this come from?  Planet Grimpe caught up with the inspiration for CAC, John Ellison, to find out more about his story and what he hopes to accomplish:

There are two sides to all this – if you are told there is no cure, you are not doing it for yourself. Time is not on my side but equally I’m not giving in. One day we may be able to cure it. The aim is to raise money around the world – money will be distributed internationally. If it is popular enough it will fund resources around the world, not just in the UK. The other aspect is awareness, as (not so much with friends now) but with some people there is an element of shock « Cancer…ooh ». So many people have changed their attitude around me – both kids and adults. If we can make cancer become a little more acceptable to talk about by raising awareness then we will have more chance of defeating it – at the moment it’s all a bit hush-hush and a dark, aggressive topic.

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Tunnel Creek

I feel almost cheated that I read this article about a devastating avalanche at a backcountry skiiing area in Washington called Tunnel Creek on my iPhone first because The New York Times‘ presentation of this story is simply amazing.  It’s stunning how they’ve managed to convey this tragic story.

While I was reading the story I couldn’t help but think about how aspects of this sad story relate to our sport of rock climbing.  Much like groups of skiiers, groups of climbers are just as susceptible to the trappings of groupthink.  So while we don’t have the level of objective hazard that is present in a sport like backcountry skiing, our sport is not without its danger.  Indeed, while climbing has been and will always be a potentially dangerous sport, the reality is that we are exposing ourselves to ever-increasing amounts of subjective hazards with the increased reliance on things like fixed gear.

This isn’t meant to spark a debate over the merits of fixed gear but rather to serve as a reminder that being cognizant and aware of what it is we’re doing out there could not be more important.  Nobody wants to be “that guy” and “ruin” the fun for everyone else, but when you listen to the heart-wrenching reactions of the people involved in the Tunnel Creek story as they hear that their friends and loved ones aren’t coming home, one can’t help but think that erring on the side of caution is always worth it.

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