New V14 In Moe’s Valley By Isaac Caldiero

Isaac Caldiero has opened a potential V14 in southern Utah’s Moe’s Valley called Force of Nature according to his 8a scorecard:

SO Psyched!! By far the hardest piece of stone i’ve ever climbed, spent so many days trying, lost count. 6 hard V11 moves into a V12 move.

A few pictures of the line can be seen here.

Posted In: Asides, Bouldering, News
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12 Responses to New V14 In Moe’s Valley By Isaac Caldiero

  1. Ian February 6, 2013 at 9:18 pm #

    Yeah Isaac!

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  2. Chris Healy February 6, 2013 at 9:55 pm #

    I totally set up another line on this boulder! It’s like perpendicular to this line. Nice Isaac!!! It looks sick.

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  3. Roger February 8, 2013 at 9:18 am #

    Maybe the times have changed, but if the hardest move is a V12, shouldn’t the problem be graded a V12 instead of V14? Or is grading for bouldering more complicated?

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    • Narc February 8, 2013 at 9:26 am #

      The generally accepted “equation” these days when evaluating the overall difficulty of a boulder problem comprised of two parts like this would be to add the two grades, divide by 2 and then add 2. That would give a grade of V13.5 to account for the overall difficulty of climbing the entire problem as opposed to climbing individual parts of it.

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      • Andrew Cassidy February 10, 2013 at 9:13 pm #

        So… (V2 + V14) / 2 + 2 = V10. I understand that this is a contrived example and you’re response will probably that the equation only works when it in inflates either of the grades of the two problems that are linked up (such as in the case of V11 + V12 ultimately equaling V13.5). I get that there should be some logic behind proposing a grade… but where I’m from, something gets a grade of V(X) (X is a variable) if me and the group of people who climbed it think it is harder than the V(X-1)s of the area. Its subjective. Although these mathematical rules are quite nice (i.e. the hardest move on a 5.12a should be V3/V4 is another one I’ve heard), I can think of climbs that don’t fit these equations that most people think are “solid” for the grade.

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        • Dan February 11, 2013 at 12:49 am #

          No one is suggesting that this equation holds true for all boulder problems, or that it should be used instead of comparison to established problems for grading. It is merely an attempt to describe how grades tend to add up for a certain type of problem. Some people like to play around with that type of thing.

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    • Dan February 8, 2013 at 11:17 am #

      I understand that this may have been the way routes were graded at some point in the past, but I don’t think it’s been done that way for multiple decades. And it was never done that way with the V-scale. Grades are given to describe the overall difficulty of the climb, not the single hardest move.

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    • climblikeman February 9, 2013 at 11:11 pm #

      I think Daniel Woods has said the hardest he’s ever done is V13 and harder problems are about how many of these moves are in a row.

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      • climblikeman February 9, 2013 at 11:13 pm #

        *move*

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  4. Regan February 11, 2013 at 12:57 am #

    The Equation…. http://climbingczar.lt11.com/about-2/

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  5. mikd October 6, 2013 at 2:23 pm #

    the fact of the matter is the climb is hard. hard enough to be a next level above the others. stop looking into the numbers so much

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