Wheel Of Life Repeated By Ian Dory

Ian Dory is back in Australia again with Dave Graham and Nalle Hukkataival after a successful 2011 trip that he recapped in this excellent report.  In that post Dory mentions his efforts on Dai Koyamada’s Grampians testpiece The Wheel Of Life:

Overall the climb is a combination of 5 boulder problems: v9, v12, v9, v11, v8. After climbing with James Kassay I have been incredibly motivated to come back and take it down next trip. But what James has also taught me is that this climb takes time and is truly hands down difficult.

It looks like Dory’s motivation paid off as he was able to complete the full problem for its likely 7th ascent a few days ago.

Posted In: Asides, Bouldering, News
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12 Responses to Wheel Of Life Repeated By Ian Dory

  1. sp June 21, 2012 at 1:25 pm #

    Awesome send, congrats to Ian. Love the fact that this line seems to avoid being labeled with an accurate grade. Iconic climb and massive test-piece for the elite of our day which gives no incentive to climb other than it’s sheer awesomeness and pure enjoyment in climbing.

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    • Austin Howell June 28, 2012 at 12:56 pm #

      I love it! My friends have a grades for things like this that defy labels… it’s a V-Hard Rockclimb… the “V” stands for “Very”

      alternatively there are V-Awesome, V-Fun, V-Spooky, and so on. Thinking like that just makes for a chill day sometimes.

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  2. CarlosFromPhilly June 21, 2012 at 2:48 pm #

    As an April Fool’s joke, someone should stick bolts to the roof with tape.

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    • D June 21, 2012 at 8:42 pm #

      I think jokes are supposed to be funny…

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  3. PmvIII June 22, 2012 at 6:56 am #

    As an Australian climber I am constantly amazed at the fact people want to call this climb a route. It is a boulder problem, dai the first person to do the climb called it a problem, shouldn’t it be him to decide if it is a route or not? It is literally 1-3 ft off the ground for most of the problem. No gear is used, no height issues so it’s not a solo… Ad nauseum. People always talk about respect, so respect the FA, it’s a problem…

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    • Yo Chi June 22, 2012 at 9:15 am #

      Actually, in an article in Climbing magazine a few years back it appears that Dai changed his mind considering the grade. The relevant quote is below:

      “V16 mutterings have been heard again for the latter, although Dai figures that at sixty-plus moves, a route rating of 5.15a is probably more appropriate.”

      http://www.climbing.com/exclusive/features/japan235/index8.html

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    • Oh really June 22, 2012 at 10:07 am #

      Huh? It is what it is, calling it something isn’t going to change it. People are using route GRADES to describe it because they feel that’s the best way to describe it’s DIFFICULTY, not the qualities of the climb itself. I don’t see how it has anything to do with “respecting the FA.” They aren’t trying to magically turn a low, horizontal roof into a vertical wall via the power of language.

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  4. Guidoprincess June 22, 2012 at 11:18 am #

    The pictures of them bouldering directly underneath Taipan Wall make me oh so sad :(.

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  5. nakedslabwhippers June 22, 2012 at 2:53 pm #

    In my opinion, anything that can be climbed without a rope, and within relative safety, is a boulder problem. Sure, this roof is long, but it stays low. The maybe not so well defined line is when a problem becomes so highball that it could (should) get bolts and become a route. Besides, what’s the alternative, an internationally agreed upon standard number of moves a boulder problem can have before it becomes a route? That seems pretty silly. But yeah, in the end it doesn’t matter. It has a start and an end and it’s really really hard.

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    • Pease June 22, 2012 at 4:11 pm #

      No one is saying that it isn’t a boulder problem. They just think that its difficulty can be more accurately described by a route grade than a boulder grade. Who cares what it’s classified as? Everyone knows what the thing looks like at this point.

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  6. Kenny June 26, 2012 at 7:39 pm #

    For god’s sake can you get over numbers, grades and definitions! The Wheel is what it is… one of the most amazing pieces of roof climbing in the world! Just shuttup and go climb on it!

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    • Me June 26, 2012 at 8:37 pm #

      I love when people act like you have to either appreciate and enjoy climbing, or discuss grades and ethics. No way you can do both, no sir.

      Anyway, you’re here just like the rest of us, so maybe you should chill out a bit.

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