Harrington & Elias Summit Everest

Harrington & Elias Summit Everest

Congratulations are in order to Emily Harrington and Sam Elias who both stood on top of Mt. Everest not too long ago as a part of their North Face/Nat Geo expedition.  Say what you will about the current state of climbing on Everest, what with this season making news for expeditions canceling their season due to bad conditions, massive crowding and several deaths, but summiting Everest is still a pretty cool accomplishment.  Best of luck to Harrington and Elias on a safe passage back to base camp and then back home.

Stood on the top of Mount Everest this morning. En route back down to the real world. @ @ @ @
@bookofsamuel
Sam Elias
Stood on the top of the world this morning, en route back down safely. The North Face National Geographic Mayo... http://t.co/YnKd94fu
@emilyaharringto
Emily Harrington

Emily Harrington on the summit of Mt. Everest with 8,481 meter Makalu in the background

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23 Responses to Harrington & Elias Summit Everest

  1. James May 25, 2012 at 7:38 am #

    Is it really? Don’t get me wrong I would love to, but merely submitting Everest these days appears to be a question of “do you have the money” not of “do you have the skill” (clearly Emily et al aren’t the average plastic surgeon going up but I think unless they did something unusual…. Hard route, speed ascent, overnight on the summit without oxygen this isn’t particularly news worthy)

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  2. Joe May 25, 2012 at 7:54 am #

    Think the fact that several people have died this season is a sign that it is still a test piece for most regardless of the money. Fair play to them both and anyone else that has spent the time to get in shape to attempt it or actually do it.

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    • james May 25, 2012 at 12:10 pm #

      maybe that speaks more to the inexperience of and sheer number of those allowed to attempt to climb it/guides/ and poor behavior (walking over/past those in trouble) of many of the same more than it speaks to the actual difficulty of the climb

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      • Joe May 25, 2012 at 3:15 pm #

        Yeah I’d possibly agree with you in the case of those who died due to injury but reading the articles there appeared to be a few that died of exhaustian after the summit or stroke at lower base camps. I guess altitude can do weird things to the body especially when you’re in the mind set of wanting to actually accomplish what you set out to do! I take back my ‘several people’ statement as well. It’s actually 11 people that have died apparently.

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        • SP May 25, 2012 at 5:29 pm #

          This post belies your understanding of the issue. These persons who died of exhaustion or other means on the decent accomplished nothing, or at least only some of their goal.

          Before I started climbing on big mountains, I ran into Conrad Anker, who told me that his best advice for alpine climbing was to stay humble. I think the best advice he gave me was actually something everyone says; “Summitting is the half way point of your climb.”

          Knowing ones limits is something that comes from experience. Dying after a summit bid from altitude related issues is not something to be proud of, and is certainly indicative of lacking experience.

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    • Hater May 29, 2012 at 4:16 pm #

      Probably had something to do with everyone updating their instsgram and twitter accounts ever 5 feet.

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      • Joe May 31, 2012 at 11:37 am #

        Oh I see what you did there. Sadly I don’t use either of the two websites but good attempted dig there if not a little uncalled for. I will however hold back from making equally short sighted comments back in your direction.

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  3. bearded J May 25, 2012 at 8:06 am #

    I think unless you have summited Everest and actually get out there and do something like this you should really just keep you comments to yourself….enough already with the cyber opinions. Any time anyone is out climbing and pushing their own boundaries it can be deemed as a success.

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    • james May 25, 2012 at 12:16 pm #

      right, so no one is allowed to comment on anything they haven’t personally experienced. You can’t judge the behavior of politicians unless you yourself have been one…. what an asinine argument.

      I didn’t say it isn’t a success, or that they shouldn’t be proud, just that on from a global climbing perspective (ie is it really something that is “news” worthy) I am under the opinion that it is not a “great accomplishment.” They are more than welcome to personally feel that they have done something great in their life for having summited. I’m happy for them and wish them the best on their descent, I merely don’t understand how this is “news.” It clearly isn’t news when any of the other of the hundreds attempting to summit do, how are they any different? Did they do an unusually difficult route? Did they spend the night on the summit? What exactly did they do that sets their summit apart from some rich surgeon who hardly even hikes put throws down $90,000 and gets pulled to the summit?

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  4. Narc May 25, 2012 at 8:09 am #

    While it’s not cutting edge or even very sporting to climb the “normal” route on Everest with oxygen, it’s not often that climbers from our rock climbing sphere step into that world which is why I found their climb at least somewhat interesting.

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    • Roelof May 27, 2012 at 5:55 am #

      This summit, a couple of days ago, would have been much more interesting news: without oxygen, and great pictures. http://www.uelisteck.ch/en/news/news/329-everest.html

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    • Guidoprincess May 29, 2012 at 3:17 pm #

      For me, I see two directions you can go with this website You can either report extraordinary climbing achievements regardless of who achieves them or you can record all achievements by a select group of people you predetermine extraordinary. The first would be like this: unknown climber sends 15a, gnarly alpinist dude summits k2 by some gnarly route, etc… The second is like this “Joe Kinder works 12c into submission, Sam Elias farts in a coffee shop, Emily Harrington tweets that it smells good.”

      Your choice…

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  5. Amusement park May 25, 2012 at 10:16 am #

    Congratulations?

    http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=39597

    A lot of ‘climbers’ on the Everest must have climbed or ascended over, or next to, dead or dying people in the last week. I’ve read some horrible reports already.

    Most of them Paying 40.000+ dollar per person to do so?

    A 73 year old woman was on the top, I think one weeks ago and the oldest person who climbed Everest was 76. Maybe a minimum age of 70 to climb Everest would be a good thing for the future.

    I am sure Nat Geo /TNF’s story is going to be a great story of success… Unfortunately the blogpost on their website about Simone Moro leaving the team can only be read on iPad.

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  6. Matt May 25, 2012 at 12:54 pm #

    “Climbing Everest is the ultimate in the opposite of [an adventure], because you get all these high-powered plastic surgeons and CEOs… They pay $80,000 and have Sherpas who put all the ladders in place and 8,000 feet of fixed rope. You get to a camp, and you don’t even have to lay out your sleeping bag. It’s already laid out with a little chocolate mint on top.

    And the whole purpose of climbing something like Everest is to affect some sort of spiritual and physical gain. But if you compromise the process, you’re an asshole when you start out and you’re an asshole when you get back.”

    -Yvon Chouinard

    Just saying…

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  7. chris May 25, 2012 at 1:01 pm #

    Great job…

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  8. Sam Rushing May 25, 2012 at 1:54 pm #

    Congrats to Sam and Emily. I know you have to be excited. Stay safe and keep climbing.
    peace,
    just sam
    ouray, colorado

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  9. Narc May 25, 2012 at 2:33 pm #

    http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/blog/view/everest_sucking_on_the_barrel

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    • SP May 25, 2012 at 3:19 pm #

      Gave you thumbs down when I meant up… sorry narc

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      • Narc May 25, 2012 at 3:23 pm #

        Not anymore you didn’t 🙂

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  10. dand May 28, 2012 at 5:15 am #

    what are a bunch of rock climbers going on about mountaineering for, like we know something hahaha

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  11. Punt Pusher May 28, 2012 at 10:50 pm #

    Ha ha, A professional badass mountain guide, two skinny ass sport climbers from Boulder. Totally, let’s put that in National Geographic, R&I, and for sure… Alpinist. Surrounded by North Face ads of course. Props to Sam & Emily for doing it… Hopefully for the right reasons and not Ads and “Opinions”.

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  12. texasclimber May 29, 2012 at 11:11 am #

    I say awesome job Emily and Sam!!! Shoot, I’d be psyched if I summited

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  13. Dave's NY June 15, 2012 at 12:49 pm #

    Congratulations, Sam and Emily! Summiting Mt. Everest is no small accomplishment. Stories like this really inspire me to persevere through any difficult task.

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