Between Rocklands And A Hard Place

Why???

Discarded climbing tape and litter are an everyday find at the climbing areas; faeces and toilet paper are hidden in caves and under rocks; and huge tick lines and graffiti are abundant. It’s important to stress that the majority of climbers are considerate of the environment when at the crags, but there are always exceptions to the rule. The closure of one area here in Rocklands is solely due to us and, if we’re not careful, we will lose this stunning destination altogether.

Posted In: Access, Asides, Bouldering
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6 Responses to Between Rocklands And A Hard Place

  1. Dan August 20, 2013 at 11:40 am #

    Really depressing. I sincerely hope that we can figure out a way to enjoy these popular mega-areas without destroying them. Maybe a good first step would be some bathrooms at the popular parking areas?

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  2. Paul August 21, 2013 at 1:53 am #

    “It’s important to stress that the majority of climbers are considerate of the environment when at the crags, but there are always exceptions to the rule.”

    Bullshit. Everyone always says that about these issues… it’s only one or two bad apples. Nonsense. If it was so few people it wouldn’t be as big a problem as it is. So it’s not just one or two, it’s most boulderers who go to Rocklands. So boulderers, sort out bouldering! Stop just standing back and saying, “It’s not me!”, or “It’s not most of us!”.

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    • Narc August 21, 2013 at 9:31 am #

      Unfortunately, it’s human nature to always assume that the problem lies with someone else. It’s also unfortunate that this issue is not limited to bouldering as I’ve seen some pretty disgusting sport areas as well. I think bouldering is no doubt more susceptible to these sorts of problems due to how the sport allows for large groups of people to form more often than other disciplines, but it is far from unique in having these sorts of problems.

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    • cgh August 21, 2013 at 10:51 am #

      I agree. Walk into the desert in the Buttermilks, for example, and kick your foot into the sand. Chances are good you’ll unearth toilet paper, poop or tampons. In those dry environments, that stuff stays around for years, and it’s everywhere.

      The problem is people think their particular action – shitting and “burying” it and the toilet paper under some rocks behind a boulder, for example – is so small that it doesn’t do any harm. Multiply that by 10,000 though and watch what happens.

      It’s a cumulative effect. People need to understand that they should leave NOTHING – no poop, no toilet paper, no tampons, no excessive chalk.

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      • Narc August 21, 2013 at 10:58 am #

        I think we are well past the point where pooping outside anywhere near a climbing area should happen. No tampons seems like an obvious one but I can’t speak to that with as much experience.

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      • Dan August 21, 2013 at 12:44 pm #

        I think you are right, most people simply don’t understand the sheer volume of climbers that come through these places every year. I read on the BLM website that “The Pit” climbers campground in Bishop had over 14,000 visitors last season. The total number of climbers was likely even higher. I think some prominent informational signs at parking areas might do some good. I really think most visitors are completely unaware that they need to consider their actions being multiplied by tens of thousands.

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